Dwight Worden  
   
 
 


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Dwight's White Papers

SHOULD DEL MAR'S SEA LEVEL RISE ADAPTATION PLAN BE PUT IN THE COMMUNITY PLAN, IN OUR LCP, OR BOTH?
September 24, 2018


Summary Conclusions:
1. Del Mar should submit its approved Sea Level Rise Adaptation Plan (AP) to the Coastal Commission for certification as part of our Local Coastal Program (LCP).
That is the best way to ensure managed retreat is not forced on us, that Del Mar retains maximum local control, and that we maximize our ability to secure the grant funds, permits, and regional cooperation needed to carry out our favored strategies of sand replenishment, sand retention, river dredging, a living levee to control flooding in low lying areas, and the right to build seawalls (collectively referred to in this paper as "favored strategies"). Only by adding the Adaptation Plan to our LCP do we make it the standard of review that the Coastal Commission must apply in Del Mar matters.

2. The Coastal Commission cannot force Del Mar to adopt managed retreat. If, as part of the certification process the Coastal Commission attempts to add managed retreat to the AP, Del Mar has the right to reject those modifications.

3. Putting our Adaptation Plan into the Community Plan offers some benefits, but doing so does not make it part of the standard of review binding on the Coastal Commission. The Coastal Commission can ignore our Community Plan. The LCP is the standard of review the Commission must use, not the Community Plan. Our current LCP, now decades old, does not address sea level rise, does not reject managed retreat, and does not contain our favored strategies. If our AP is not added to our LCP to cover these key topics, it is left to the Commission's discretion to interpret and fill in the gaps.

For these reasons, I support putting the Adaptation Plan into both the LCP and the Community Plan. It is inadequate, however, to put the AP solely into the Community Plan.

[To read the full White Paper in PDF format, click here.]


SHORT TERM RENTALS AND ENFORCEMENT
September 13, 2016

An effective Short Term Rental (STR) program for Del Mar needs three supporting legs to be successful:

  • Consistency With The Community Plan, Zoning, And Local Coastal Program
  • An Effective Enforcement Program
  • A Workable Administrative Implementation Program

* * *
It is my conclusion that enforcing the key provisions of an STR regulatory program to “allow but regulate” STRs in residential zones [would be] difficult to impossible.  An enforcement program that meets the criteria of deterring and correcting violations would need to be as intrusive as to, arguably, go beyond what is authorized by current law and to tread upon the property and privacy rights of home owners.  To serve as effective deterrents, fines and penalties would need to be higher than the amounts currently authorized.

 An enforcement program that is not intrusive and instead relies on traditional enforcement strategies as set out in the Del Mar code would likely fail to meet the key success criterion of actually deterring and correcting violations. .... [To read the full White Paper in PDF format, click here.]


GETTING TO THE BEACH JUST GOT HARDER
August 2016

NCTD recently announced increased enforcement of trespassing laws along its rail right of way. Tickets will be issued carrying fines up to $500 and 6 months in jail. What’s up? Why the new rules? Access along and across the tracks in Del Mar has a long history. Joggers, dog walkers, beach goers and others are in the right of way every day, and that has been the case for decades. There is no way for the public to get to the beach south of Powerhouse Park without illegally crossing the tracks until one gets all the way to Torrey Pines State Beach. Ditto for all those to the east wanting to get to the beach between the Jimmy Durante/CDM overpass and Via de la Valle. Why the crack down now? Answer: crossing the tracks has never been legal. What has changed is until now NCTD has chosen to hold off aggressively enforcing the trespass rules.... [To read the full White Paper in PDF format, click here.]

CRACKING THE CONUNDRUM:
PROVIDING QUALITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN DEL MAR WHILE FACING A BALLOT MEASURE
August 2016

State law requires Del Mar to provide new affordable housing.  Like it or not, this state obligation is mandatory. According to the state, as reflected in our Housing Element,  Del Mar needs to provide 12 units at the extremely low, very low, and low income levels, and 49 at the moderate to above moderate income levels.  But is affordable housing just something being forced down our throats by the state? I think not.

Providing affordable places to live in Del Mar for our seniors, for our firefighters, young families with children, students, schoolteachers, and others in the middle class contributes positively to the fabric of our community..... [To read the full White Paper in PDF format, click here.]

 

ANALYSIS OF COMMUNITY PLAN AND ZONING PROVISIONS THAT APPLY TO SHORT TERM RENTALS
July 2, 2016

The topic of Short Term Rentals (“STRs”) is currently before the Council and community for potential regulation.  In this paper I will examine the key foundational issue: are STRs allowed in Del Mar’s residential areas by the Del Mar Community Plan and Zoning Code? My conclusion is they are not. If Del Mar determines that allowing STRs in residential areas is desirable, then Community Plan and Zoning Code Amendments are required to change the current rules.... [To read the full White Paper in PDF format, click here.]


 

 

Videos

The 19 Trails of Del Mar ( video)

Nick Chisari edited this video about 19 trails and walking paths in Del Mar. Some are little-known, even to long-time residents. This terrific video brings to mind the Community Plan's call for a "pedestrian oriented environment" and "a surrounding belt of natural open space to buffer Del Mar permanently from the sprawling adjacent residential areas,,,and a scenic trail system circumscribing the city." We have only partly met these goals, but this video inspires us to do better!


Urban Hiking with Liz Thomas: Seattle

Liz "Snorkel" Thomas, a Triple-Crown hiker, is featured in this video that shows how great urban hiking can be - and some interesting public art is featured, too. In Del Mar, we don't have all these urban stairs, but we have plenty of hills.

 


 

 


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